Authors

Master of the Parrot

First half of 16th century

A Flemish painter active in Antwerp between 1500 and 1530, introduced by Friedländer in an article published in 1949 in Phoebus magazine, in which he was assigned this name because of the parrots which appeared in some of his works. Since then, we have found out more about this painter thanks to additional studies by Friedländer, as well as Marlier and Díaz Padrón. In the past, his work has been confused with that of Gossaert, who was one of his influences, and with his contemporary the Master of the Half-Lengths. There seems to be no doubt that there was contact between their circles, as they share the same range of themes, the mundane gentleness of their aristocratic models and the Mannerism in the oval faces and delicacy of the painting. His figures, however, with their wide faces, small noses, and straight eyelids distinguish him from the others. As M. Díaz Padrón points out: “ We find in the Master of the Parrot more chromatic ardour, more expression and humanity”. Another recurring theme in his work is Saint Mary Magdalene, and as G. Marlier asserts, “of Magdalene, they only have the name”. They appear to be more in keeping with portraits of young aristocrats at Margaret of Austria’s court and we can assume he was influenced by A. Benson and contacts from the Bruges school, from where the theme is derived.

Virgin and Child

Virgin and Child

Virgin and Child

Virgin and Child

Saint Mary Magdalen

Saint Mary Magdalen